Nothing communicates better than well-designed presentations. Ken Whitaker has spent years creating slide decks for keynotes, tutorials, and workshops on programming, graphics design, and agile leadership. With the creation of eLearning course, he has developed presentations to be recorded as videos to augment course material.

Presentation Design

Presentations That Make a Difference

 

Well-designed presentations can then be transformed into recordings for use in preparing eLearning courseware or YouTube videos. Click to view an excerpt from a software programmer’s “how to” tutorial created in PowerPoint:

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PRESENTATION

Ken has uncovered a few tips and techniques that could make a difference in presentations.

 

Fewer slides (or lots of slides): A common misconception is that the fewer the slides, the better:

If you spend 3-5 minutes on one slide, you’ll have fewer slides. On the other hand, if each slide can be presented in 30 seconds, you’ll have a lot more slides. If you use a large slide deck, just make sure that each of those fast-paced slides isn’t “possessed” with completely different coloring, look, and content. The last thing an attendee wants is to get visual whiplash.

 

Limit lists: Bullet list-laden slides are bad, very bad. True, however, sometimes bulleted items are the easiest technique to get your points across:

Just limit the items to a bare minimum and use a graphic or two to add some pizzazz.

 

Emphasize notes, limit slide content: Take a “see” versus “say” approach that puts more emphasis in text notes with less on the slide:

 

Tick-tock, you have just 1 minute: To keep the attention of your audience, rethink the sequence of slides in your presentation. Rather than a slow lead up to the benefits (values) being presented, explain “the Why” near the beginning:

 

Before ending a presentation, recap the few actionable points you want the audience to remember.

 

Creating Effective Presentations

 

There are a few fundamentals that Ken has found to create effective presentations:

  • Adherence to branding standards
  • Use of graphics and visual talking points (rather than bulleted lists)
  • Logical flow between slides with simple slide transitions
  • Use crisp graphics (flow and data visualization) to add variety and improve understanding

 

Sometimes the creative use of an animated “talking head” and an introductory movie clip can add just the pizazz a recorded presentation needs. Download and view an enhanced version of the same tutorial presentation:

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SAMPLE PRESENTATION

On any project, time spent on planning (project specification) and design (storyboarding and outline) will reduce the risk scope creep,  endless frustration, and “redos.” Also, Ken can develop a presentation slide deck in Adobe InDesign that can be viewed in a number of exported formats including Interactive PDF.

Visually Inspiring Presentations

 

 

 

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AND PRESENTATION

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PRESENTATION DESIGN

 

 

1201-1440

 . . .

1025-1200

Ken has uncovered a few tips and techniques that could make a difference in presentations.

 

Fewer slides (or lots of slides): A common misconception is that the fewer the slides, the better:

Limit lists: Bullet list-laden slides are bad, very bad. True, however, sometimes bulleted items are the easiest technique to get your points across:

601-1024

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375-600